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Majestic Kids 5K stepping off April 28

The deadline to register is Saturday

Each year, Majestic Kids hosts Royal Family Kids Camp at Dickson Valley Camp in Newark, Illinois. The organization helps to raise enough funds to send 50 local foster children to camp this summer, but the cost per child is $650, so fundraisers are a must.
Each year, Majestic Kids hosts Royal Family Kids Camp at Dickson Valley Camp in Newark, Illinois. The organization helps to raise enough funds to send 50 local foster children to camp this summer, but the cost per child is $650, so fundraisers are a must.

When children have been taken from their homes and placed in foster care, the event can cause a feeling of not being wanted. Add to the fact that many foster children then get bounced from home to home, their lives can swerve in many directions with possible loss of contentment.

Majestic Kids, a not-for-profit acting as a balloon over a local Royal Family Kids Camp, a yearlong Mentor Club program, teen retreats, long-term educational support and family care, embraces children in Will, Grundy and Kendall counties. Its aim was to provide hope for foster children to be able to rise to their fullest potential, according to Majestic Kids.

Year round, the organization fundraises in order to provide the camps and other programs to the foster children who can be classified as at-risk youth. Majestic Kids offers these programs for foster children ages 6 to 18.

In July, Majestic Kids will sponsor the Royal Family Kids Camp in Newark. The total cost per foster child, aged six to 12 years, to attend the week long camp rests at $650. The max number of children who can attend camp was set at 50, but funds have to be raised in order to make that goal a reality.

This year, Majestic Kids stepped out of its box due to recommendations from fellow volunteers and supporters, and replaced the annual walk-a-thon with the Majestic Purple Run 5K in Minooka on April 28. The run and walk, sponsored by The Shrimp Barn, will kick off in front of the restaurant at 125 W. Mondamin St. in downtown Minooka and take to the streets of Minooka.

Runners and walkers alike will head down Wapella Street to North Street and back. This course offers curves, flatland and hills to challenge any skill level of runner and give a good workout to those who chose to walk.

The deadline to register for one of the 200 spots and receive a t-shirt and medal was set at April 7, but online and day-of registration will be available, but medals and shirts will not be available for later registrants.

Just like the walk-a-thon, event planner Tricia Rogge hopes that runner and walkers go above and beyond the registration fee and bring extra donations and pledges to the run on April 28. The walk-a-thon brought in around $15,000, but due to a decline in enrollment the past two years, a change was needed. Rogge said she expects the donations to be less because of the inaugural event, but she hopes those who want to support Majestic Kids pull through for the kids.

“The kids we are helping are local; they go to our schools with our kids and live in our neighborhoods. This organization helps them to feel a part of something, it gives them a place to call home and this all expenses paid camp week, plus mentoring is important,” Rogge said.

The children who go to camp have one week free of worry of their situation. They can be in nature and sleep in cabins. They fish, swim, paint, make crafts, learn about the Bible and Jesus, play games, ride bicycles, have a camp fire, play basketball, have a group birthday party and the list goes on. The children create bonds with others in their same situation and have a one-on-one volunteer mentor to guide and listen to them.

The rest of the year, the children from ages six to 18 have mentor opportunities with a volunteer who cares about their well being, they attend teen retreats and even have the opportunity to help at camp.

“Many times this organization is the only support these kids have in their lives. Many are shuffled from home to home to home. This gives them a sense of priority, home and adults who care for them and do not disappear. This keeps them grounded,” Rogge said.

To learn more about Majestic Kids go to Majestickids.org. To contact call 815-475-4680 or email at hoperises@majestickids.org.

To register for the run/walk go to https://www.raceentry.com/race-reviews/majestic-purple-run.

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